Monthly Archives: December 2013

Troubled Launch of ‘Obamacare’ Tops Health News for 2013

Troubled Launch of ‘Obamacare’ Tops Health News for 2013

December 30, 2013 | By Health Editor

online-computer-help-400x400

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, Dec. 27, 2013 (HealthDay News) — As 2013 nears to a close, the year’s top health news story — the fumbled debut of the Affordable Care Act, often dubbed Obamacare — continues to grab headlines.

The Obama administration had high hopes for its health-care reform package, but technical glitches on the federal government’s HealthCare.gov portal put the brakes on all that. Out of the millions of uninsured who stood to benefit from wider access to health insurance coverage, just six were able to sign up for such benefits on the day of the website’s Oct. 1 launch, according to a government memo obtained by the Associated Press.

Those numbers didn’t rise much higher until far into November, when technical crews went to work on the troubled site, often shutting it down for hours for repairs. Republicans opposed to the Affordable Care Act pounced on the debacle, and a month after the launch Health and Human Services secretary Kathleen Sebelius told Americans, “You deserve better, I apologize.”

Also apologizing was President Barack Obama, who in November said he was “sorry” to hear that some Americans were being dropped from their health plans due to the advent of reforms — even though he had repeatedly promised that this would not happen.

However, by year’s end the situation began to look a bit rosier for backers of health-care reform. By Dec. 11, Health and Human Services announced that nearly 365,000 consumers had successfully selected a health plan through the federal- and state-run online “exchanges,” although that number was still far below initial projections.

And a report issued the same day found that one new tenet of the reform package — allowing young adults under 26 to be covered by their parents’ plans — has led to a significant jump in coverage for people in that age group.

Another story dominating health news headlines in the first half of the year was the announcement by film star Angelina Jolie in May that she carried the BRCA breast cancer gene mutation and had opted for a double mastectomy to lessen her cancer risk. In an op-ed piece in The New York Times, Jolie said her mother’s early death from BRCA-linked ovarian cancer had played a big role in her decision.

The article immediately sparked discussion on the BRCA mutations, whether or not women should be tested for these anomalies, and whether preventive mastectomy was warranted if they tested positive. A Harris Interactive/HealthDay poll conducted in August found that, following Jolie’s announcement, 5 percent of respondents — equivalent to about 6 million U.S. women — said they would now seek medical advice on the issue.

Americans also struggled with the psychological impact of two acts of horrific violence — the December 2012 Newtown, Conn., school massacre that left 20 children and six adults dead and the bombing of the Boston marathon in April of this year. Both tragedies left deep wounds on the hearts and minds of people at the scenes, as well as the tens of millions of Americans who watched the carnage through the media.

Indeed, a study released in December suggested that people who had spent hours each day tracking coverage of the Boston bombing had stress levels that were often higher than some people actually on the scene.

Major changes to the way doctors are advised to care for patients’ hearts also spurred controversy in 2013. In November, a panel from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology issued guidelines that could greatly expand the number of Americans taking cholesterol-lowering statin drugs.

One month later, an independent panel of experts issued its own recommendations on the control of high blood pressure — guidelines that might shrink the number of people who take blood pressure drugs. Both recommendations ignited controversy as to their validity, and debate on these issues is likely to continue, experts say.

Contraception is another medical issue that’s no stranger to controversy. In June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration sparked both applause and outrage when it moved the Plan B “morning after” pill to over-the-counter status, with no age restrictions in place. The move came after protracted legal battles, led by the Obama administration, to prevent such access.

Other stories making headlines in 2013 included:

  • Higher numbers of children diagnosed and treated for ADHD. One in every 10 U.S. children is now diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced in November, although the agency also said the years-long rise in cases has begun to slow. And while some experts say better diagnosis of ADHD is long overdue, many Americans worry that children are being “overmedicated” for psychological issues.
  • The ongoing epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse. Early in 2013, a federal government report found that abuse of prescription painkillers such as OxyContin and Vicodin now trails only marijuana use as a form of drug abuse, and 22 million Americans have abused a prescription painkiller since 2002. Reacting to the crisis, the FDA in October announced tighter restrictions on Vicodin and painkillers like it.
  • Pro football and head injuries. The 2012 suicide of retired National Football League star linebacker Junior Seau, followed by the 2013 death of former Michigan college quarterback Cullen Finnerty — both of whom had suffered concussion-linked brain damage — helped spark a national debate on the dangers of head injury in amateur and professional sports. By year’s end, the NFL announced that it was partnering with the U.S. National Institutes of Health on a major study into the long-term effects of repeat head injuries and better concussion diagnosis.
  • CDC anti-smoking campaign beat expectations. Perhaps one of the most positive health stories of the year was the success of the CDC’s hard-hitting “Tips From Former Smokers” ad campaign. The ads often focused on the difficulties in breathing or managing everyday tasks faced by people ravaged by smoking-induced disease. CDC officials said the campaign spurred a 75 percent jump in calls to a stop-smoking hotline and a 38-fold rise in visits to the campaign’s website.
  • A new focus on “friendly” tummy bugs. A number of high-profile studies were published in 2013 highlighting the role of “helpful” microbes living in the trillions in the human digestive tract. New research is suggesting that the human-microbe relationship may have a big impact on conditions ranging from infant colic to obesity. Successful “fecal transplants” were also described, which allow patients sickened by dangerous gut bugs to import disease-fighting microbial communities from healthy donors.


Embarrassed on Facebook? Surprisingly Common, Survey Finds

Embarrassed on Facebook? Surprisingly Common, Survey Finds

December 30, 2013 | By Health Editor

facebook-relationships

By Amy Norton
HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, Dec. 26, 2013 (HealthDay News) — If you spend much time on Facebook untagging yourself in unflattering photos and embarrassing posts, you’re not alone.

A new study, however, finds that some people take those awkward online moments harder than others.

In an online survey of 165 Facebook users, researchers found that nearly all of them could describe a Facebook experience in the past six months that made them feel awkward, embarrassed or uncomfortable. But some people had stronger emotional reactions to the experience, the survey found.

Not surprisingly, Facebook users who put a lot of stock in socially appropriate behavior or self-image were more likely to be mortified by certain posts their friends made, such as a photo where they’re clearly drunk or one where they’re perfectly sober but looking less than attractive.

“If you’re someone who’s more self-conscious offline, it makes sense that you would be online too,” said Dr. Megan Moreno, of Seattle Children’s Hospital and the University of Washington.

Moreno, who was not involved in the research, studies young people’s use of social media.

“There was a time when people thought of the Internet as a place you go to be someone else,” Moreno said. “But now it’s become a place that’s an extension of your real life.”

And social sites like Facebook and Twitter have made it trickier for people to keep the traditional boundaries between different areas of their lives, Moreno said. In offline life, she said, people generally have different “masks” that they show to different people — one for your close friends, another for your mom and yet another for your coworkers.

On Facebook — where your mom, your best friend and your boss are all among your 700 “friends” — “those masks are blown apart,” Moreno said.

Indeed, people who use social-networking sites have handed over some of their self-presentation control to other people, said study co-author Jeremy Birnholtz, director of the Social Media Lab at Northwestern University.

But the degree to which that bothers you seems to depend on who you are and who your Facebook friends are, he said.

For the study, Birnholtz’s team used flyers and online ads to recruit 165 Facebook users — mainly young adults — for an online survey. Of those respondents, 150 said they’d had an embarrassing or awkward Facebook experience in the past six months.

Some examples: The young woman who was tagged in a picture in which she was picking food from her teeth; the 20-year-old who skipped a mandatory meeting to go to a concert, then was caught because a friend tagged her in a post; the young man who was tagged in a picture at a party where he was obviously drunk.

But the level of distress these Facebook users felt depended partly on whether they were self-conscious types in general.

It also depended on the diversity of their Facebook network, Birnholtz said. If your network includes relatives and professional acquaintances, that image of your public drunkenness might not be so funny, he said.

On the other hand, people who reported more sophisticated Facebook skills were less bothered by awkward posts. These more savvy users, Birnholtz said, know how to untag themselves in posts or change their privacy settings so friends of friends, for example, cannot see what other users post on their timeline.

Birnholtz said the survey offered some Facebook lessons. “Be cautious about who you friend, and know what your privacy settings are,” he said.

And for those who post a lot, Birnholtz suggested taking a moment to consider what you’re sharing. “When you post something, try to imagine who will see it,” he said. “Take that pause and remember that another person’s colleagues might see it. Their family might see it.”

Birnholtz said Facebook itself could help too — for example, by creating pop-ups that give people an idea of the potential visibility of their posts.

For now, Moreno agreed that honing your Facebook skills — especially when it comes to privacy settings — is a wise move. And, she said, everyone should try to think before they post, although it can be hard to know what will offend or upset.

“We’re all trying to figure out what Facebook etiquette is,” Moreno said.

Moreno added, though, that Facebook should not be singled out among social-networking sites. “In the past couple years, we’re seeing some really embarrassing stuff on Twitter,” she said.

The findings are scheduled to be presented in February at the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing, in Baltimore. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The American Academy of Pediatrics has more on young people’s social-media use.



Personal Trainers and Diet Planning

Like Tree5Likes

  1. Personal Trainers and Diet Planning

    I just have a discussion topic on my mind..

    What does everyone think about personal trainers writing diet plans for clients? This is a bit of a sketchy area for people in this field, since nowhere in the personal training scope of practice does it qualify us to create anything like that for people. Offering nutritional consult, sure, we do that all the time with no problem. But the full-on diet plan is a different story.

    Personally, I wouldn’t feel comfortable at all creating diet plans for anyone. Yeah, I have a better knowledge than the the layman off the street about macronutrients, nutritional balance, etc., to achieve certain goals, but nowhere near the extent of someone such as a dietician. But I know many trainers who do do this on a regular basis. Some of them have enough experience to do it right, but then there are many other trainers who are still in the “cut out ALL fat” stage.

    I know that a lot of trainers will get their “nutritionist” or “nutrition specialist” ticket as well. Again, I’m sure the courses for those teach a lot and can certainly qualify a person in their own right, depending on the course, but it bugs me that those titles aren’t regulated at all. I could walk out my front door and legally call myself a nutritionist right now.

    Anyway, this was a bit of a rant on my part. So my question is this. Trainers, how in-depth do you go with nutritional/diet information for clients and what additional education do you think is necessary for providing it? Clients, how much do you trust in a personal trainer’s diet plan, and do you, yourself, look for any extra credentials?

    Go.

    Dip. Exercise and Wellness | BSc Athletic/Exercise Therapy Student | CSEP-CPT | BCRPA Group Fitness Instructor


  2. I have given full diet plans when I was working as a PT, a ‘few’ years ago. I rapidly learned that doing this meant I spent more time writing them than people spent using them.
    Then I shifted to advising gradual changes, 10% diet that I have suggested here etc. and these have had a far higher success rate.
    I think the trick with PTing is to be able to remember and cope with the fact many clients will be nowhere near as into diet and fitness as we are. It was the part I couldn’t handle and why I stopped. On this topic it is why PTs need to resist the temptation to suggest an entire lifestyle change on day 1, it won’t be stuck to, and the clients will feel guilty and disappear. Tell them you will give guidance to gradual changes and keep their priorities in mind. For you it could be gym, diet, income, then other life, for them it could be family, career, bills, shopping, social life, looking nice for the other half who barely notices anyway, gym, diet, ironing.

    If you think you can, or if you think you can’t, you’re probably right – Henry Ford


  3. I’m not a trainer, nor have I been a regular client, but as someone who is long-term committed to fitness (method varies according to current goal/focus), who reads about food and nutrition for pleasure and knowledge, who regularly participates in forum discussions, and whose spouse does the same leading to many conversations at home, I have to say most PT’s should not be giving advice (and what I overhear in my gym seems rather suspect although admitedly I’m not getting the whole “plan”).

    The thing is, the same thing won’t work for every body and there is so much mis-information around. Nutrition is just not an exact science and the way one person responds to certain foods/macro’s can be hugely different than another. For example, when a body is insulin resistant (and in the US something like 80% of overweight people and 30% of normal weight people are insulin resistant) the way that body responds to carbs is much different than someone who is not insulin resistant. How is a PT going to know, blood glucose isn’t a good indicator.

    A friend just signed up for a 3 month program with an online trainer and nearly everything I’ve heard so far just has me shaking my head in disbelief – for a 150 lb woman, this trainer is suggesting 155 grams of protein a day. What? It’s just stupid. Guess we will see if that is right for my friend or if she just gags on all that protein.

    Lifestyle and priorities are a huge factor so some general guidelines might be helpful. “Stop eating garbage” is helpful advice across the board I think, but many people can even debate about what is garbage. Just getting people to think about their food choices and consider what they are eating is a huge and helpful step for most.


  4. I agree with Sure because I disagree with one part of what she said. Nutrition is a very exact science, so exact there are no guaranteed one size fits all systems.
    To give some idea for a bit of a laugh I used one of the BMI calculators online. Height, weight, gender, that will be 1,887 calories a day for you sir. It did say the system was aimed at average, not fat or fit but I would disappear with that intake. My actual intake is over 4,000 a day and I people don’t view me as fat.

    If you think you can, or if you think you can’t, you’re probably right – Henry Ford


  5. This may sound like a cop-out answer but it really isn’t.
    I would say it is a case by case basis depending on the client and the trainer.

    Let’s be honest – First: Not all trainers are the same.
    The certifications are not equal to each other and I see personal trainers everyday leading clients down a wrong path of bad technique and/or not even paying attention to them.
    Just acting as a $$$ factory.

    Also clients come in various categories –
    On one end you have the people who want to take charge of their own health.
    They often want to be taught the science and theory and they take that new knowledge to change their own eating habits

    Then we have the helpless souls that want everything done for them …..
    How many times have you heard …… “Just tell me what to do and what to eat”
    Statistically this group often does not have the best track record for long term success.

    Yes, nutrition is a science — but at the same time, it is often made to sound more complex than it really is.
    We basically have 3 macronutrients to balance and the other micronutrients that need to be accounted for.

    Once you do some quick calculations it is easy to get somebody on the right track with a good balance of lean proteins, complex carbs and essential fats.
    It’s really pretty simple for the average person trying to get in good shape.

    Now if we are designing a diet program for a pro bodybuilder during his 16 week lead up to a contest, then THAT is a different story.

    So if a trainer is comfortable in his knowledge , is covered by the usual medical and legal disclaimers and his client is totally clueless as to the basics of nutrition —- I think only good can come from getting them on the right track with a designed plan.

    And of course as Old Man properly pointed out ….. formulas like BMI are total crap.
    Inaccurate and really no basis in science
    In fact many people that are fit will calculate out as Obese using these flawed formulas.

    I myself calculate out over 30 for BMI just to give one example of how useless these kinds of mathematical theoretical calculations are.
    Forget the scale, forget BMI, forget the BMR formulas ……… the MIRROR tells the truth.

    Personal Trainers and Diet Planning-msds2.jpg
    Michael Spitzer
    Author
    Fitness at 40,50,60 and Beyond

    Last edited by mikespitzer; Dec. 25/13 at 10:54 AM.


  6. I’ve had this discussion with a lot of trainers online. The short answer I’d give is it depends. This is a hazy issue.

    The first thing I’d like to point out is that if a client wants to dramatically change their physique, they NEED to learn about nutrition and change their diets. There’s no getting around that.

    Should their trainer be the person they get their diet advice from? Depends a lot on the trainer, the client, and the trainer:client relationship.

    I did 3 semesters of nutritional studies during my 4 semester Diploma of Fitness. As such, when trainers tell me that giving nutritional advice beyond the basic “don’t eat like stupid person” is outside of my field of practice, I find that a to be a significant professional insult. FFS, we spent much less time learning how to test fitness or develop exercise programs or instruct exercises or deliver personal training sessions (you know, the stuff that we actually do in all our sessions) than we did learning about nutrition.

    In saying that, different trainers have different levels of nutritional competence. I’m absolutely confident in my ability to write a diet plan for someone who has no medical issues, in accordance with their goals. It was a requirement for my Cert IV that I do this with a real client in order to pass my course and become qualified. I wouldn’t, however, provide the same service for someone with a medical issue that could be effected by diet. In fact, it’s unlikely that I would provide this service for someone who is healthy, because if I give you a diet plan, there’s a dietitian out there who could do a much better job at it than I could, and there’s a very high chance that if I did it you wouldn’t adhere to it anyway. On the other hand, if I give you general nutritional advice related to your goals, and offer some tips on how to implement that advice, you can figure out a way that works for you to get your diet on track.

    There are trainers with much better nutritional knowledge than me. There are trainers with much worse nutritional knowledge than me. To be fair, there are much better trainers than me, and there are much worse trainers than me. Should the trainers who are generally not as good at this as me just not train people? Or should they operate within their strengths and develop broader, deeper knowledge so that they can do better/more? Trainers shouldn’t be giving out bad nutritional information. That’s a given. And for plenty of trainers, that means they shouldn’t give out nutritional advice, because they don’t have the knowledge (hopefully they know they don’t have the knowledge, so that they can know to either open a book or shut up and refer on).

    But once again, if you’re aiming to change your physique, which 90% of clients are after, you need to change your diet. Diet isn’t an elective, it’s mandatory. Since this is critical for clients to get results, as a PT I can’t justify not having sufficient nutritional knowledge to be able to give sound advice to the majority of clients. I NEED to have this knowledge because THEY NEED to have this knowledge.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sure! View Post
    I’m not a trainer, nor have I been a regular client, but as someone who is long-term committed to fitness (method varies according to current goal/focus), who reads about food and nutrition for pleasure and knowledge, who regularly participates in forum discussions, and whose spouse does the same leading to many conversations at home, I have to say most PT’s should not be giving advice (and what I overhear in my gym seems rather suspect although admitedly I’m not getting the whole “plan”).

    The thing is, the same thing won’t work for every body and there is so much mis-information around. Nutrition is just not an exact science and the way one person responds to certain foods/macro’s can be hugely different than another. For example, when a body is insulin resistant (and in the US something like 80% of overweight people and 30% of normal weight people are insulin resistant) the way that body responds to carbs is much different than someone who is not insulin resistant. How is a PT going to know, blood glucose isn’t a good indicator.

    A friend just signed up for a 3 month program with an online trainer and nearly everything I’ve heard so far just has me shaking my head in disbelief – for a 150 lb woman, this trainer is suggesting 155 grams of protein a day. What? It’s just stupid. Guess we will see if that is right for my friend or if she just gags on all that protein.

    Lifestyle and priorities are a huge factor so some general guidelines might be helpful. “Stop eating garbage” is helpful advice across the board I think, but many people can even debate about what is garbage. Just getting people to think about their food choices and consider what they are eating is a huge and helpful step for most.

    In the instance of your friend, 1g protein/lb bodyweight/day is a fairly common rule of thumb. There are a lot of individual studies which refute the 1g/lb guideline, but there was also a meta-analysis done a little while back (I think it was about a year or two ago) which looked at all the seemingly contradictory information about the effects of protein intake. It found that the studies which said “more protein =/= better results” had such a small addition that it made perfect sense for there to be no significant difference, while the studies which said “more protein = better results” had a significant enough addition of protein to show a significant difference in results. And it turned out that 1g/lb worked out to be a pretty good dose for getting improved results without entering diminishing returns/problem territory.

    In saying that, so long as you’re consuming enough protein to meet your health requirements (which is only about 0.5-0.6g/lb off the top of my head), you’ll be alright…but up to double that minimum standard does appear more effective for athletic development, at least based on this meta-analysis.

    Of course, all sources about how much protein you should consume tend to come from someone trying to sell something. A really helpful resource I had back in my Diploma days (I can’t remember where this information came from, unfortunately), prescribed something like 0.8-1g/kg for sedentary people, 1.2-1.4 for endurance athletes, and 1.4-1.7 for strength athletes. Vegan websites seem to have cottoned onto this information, but take the sedentary prescription and say that’s what everyone should be eating. They’re selling something. Up the other extreme end of the spectrum, the makers of Max-OT prescribe (IIRC) 53% of all macro-nutrients come from protein, which, on a 4,000kcal/day diet, is a bit. Did I mention that Max-OT is a program made by a supplement company? The groups that recommend 1g/lb (or 1.7g/kg) are busy trying to sell strength programs/equipment/gyms rather than special diets. Everyone’s selling something. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but it gets you thinking about motives, and what’s in it for the person giving the advice. For the trainer/gym owner, if they don’t make a cent out of food/supplements and get paid on the basis of people achieving their goals, then maybe their incentive for recommending a certain amount of protein is that it will actually support your goals. They could still be wrong, but it’s certainly more noble to try and sell something to someone so that things will work out for them than to try and sell something to them that will either hinder their goals or will do nothing to help them.

    Ryan – D.Fitness. SQ 2x150kg – BP 95kg – DL 190kg – OHP 60kg


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 6

    Last Post: Aug. 24/11, 03:24 AM

  2. Replies: 10

    Last Post: Apr. 05/11, 09:29 PM

  3. Replies: 2

    Last Post: Jun. 03/09, 09:05 AM

  4. Replies: 5

    Last Post: Jul. 31/06, 01:54 PM

  5. Replies: 0

    Last Post: Oct. 25/04, 04:18 PM


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Forum Rules

Members: 199,844
Threads: 47,230
Posts: 396,755
Top Poster: Karky (9,817)

Portable Bed Rails Can Pose Safety Hazard, FDA Says

FRIDAY, Dec. 27, 2013 (HealthDay News) — Caution is required when using portable bed rails because they put people at risk for falling or becoming trapped, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

Portable bed rails attach to a normal, adult-sized bed, often by sliding a piece of the rail under the mattress or by using the floor for support. People can get trapped in or around the rail, including between the bed-rail bars, between the rail and the mattress, or between the rail and the headboard, said Joan Todd, a senior nurse-consultant at the FDA.

“Consumers need to realize that even when bed rails are well designed and used correctly, they can present a hazard to certain individuals — particularly to people with physical limitations or who have an altered mental status, such as dementia or confusion,” Todd said in an FDA news release.

Between January 2003 and September 2012, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission received reports of 155 deaths and five injuries related to portable bed rails designed for adult use, according to the news release. More than 90 percent of the deaths were caused by entrapment.

Of the 155 deaths, 129 occurred in people aged 60 or older and 94 occurred at home. About half of the victims had a medical condition such as heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease or dementia.

The FDA has a new website on bed-rail safety that offers information about the potential hazards and advice for safe use. Here are some tips for caregivers:

  • Make sure bed rails are appropriate for the person using them. Alternatives include roll guards, foam bumpers, lowering the bed and using a concave mattress, which can help reduce the risk of rolling off the bed.
  • Not all bed rails, mattresses and bed frames are interchangeable. Check with the manufacturer to make sure the different pieces you’re using are compatible with one another.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to ensure a proper fit. There should be no gaps between the rail and the mattress. Gaps can be created by a person’s movements or if the bed’s position shifts.

“Bed rails may provide greater support and mobility when the person using them changes position or gets in and out of bed,” Todd said.

She said, however, that the rails need to be monitored and maintained so they don’t loosen over time and create unsafe openings in which a person could become trapped. “Portable bed rails must not be installed and forgotten,” she said.

Unlike hospital beds, not all portable bed rails are FDA-regulated as medical devices. The federal government has created a committee to develop voluntary standards for adult portable bed rails.

More information

Visit the FDA for more about bed rail safety.


FDA Warns Consumers Against Body-Building Supplement

FRIDAY, Dec. 27, 2013 (HealthDay News) — Consumers should not use Mass Destruction, a dietary supplement used to stimulate muscle growth, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Monday.

The body-building product, available in retail stores, fitness gyms and online, contains potentially harmful synthetic steroids and anyone currently using it should stop immediately, the FDA said.

The warning was prompted by a report from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services involving a serious injury related to use of Mass Destruction. A healthy 28-year-old man who used the product for several weeks experienced liver failure, which required a transplant, according to the FDA.

“Products marketed as supplements that contain anabolic steroids pose a real danger to consumers,” Howard Sklamberg, director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release. “The FDA is committed to ensuring that products marketed as dietary supplements and vitamins do not pose harm to consumers.”

The FDA explained that liver damage is a known risk associated with use of anabolic steroids and steroid-like substances. Although Mass Destruction’s ingredients are undergoing additional analysis, the FDA said it contains at least one synthetic anabolic steroid, according to the product’s label.

An investigation is also under way to identify the manufacturer of Mass Destruction, which is produced for Blunt Force Nutrition, based in Sims, N.C.

Anyone who believes they are experiencing problems related to Mass Destruction or other body-building products is advised to see their doctor right away and report adverse reactions to the FDA. Warning signs of health issues that could arise include the following:

  • Unexplained fatigue
  • Abdominal or back pain
  • Discolored urine
  • Any other unexplained health changes

Long-term consequences of anabolic steroid use may also include adverse effects on blood fat levels and increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to the release. Women who use anabolic steroids may also become more masculine. Meanwhile, men may experience shrinkage of the testicles, breast enlargement or infertility. Anabolic steroids can also affect children’s growth, the FDA said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more on anabolic steroids.


the secret of weight loss: Apple Cider Vinegar and lemon juice

  1. justine- 549846 is offline
    In Orientation

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    3

    the secret of weight loss: Apple Cider Vinegar and lemon juice

    Secret Weight Loss beautiful and engaging
    You are aiming to learn three beauty secrets for weight loss, healthy and delightful young hair and skin and the foremost necessary ingredient to the current beauty ****tail. Don’t simply browse it and chuck it, write it down and apply what you’re aiming to learn during this article for successive thirty days and you may see fantastic results. Secret Weight Loss Before you begin this thirty day journey and implementing this new data, begin a photograph journal from the start through the tip and compare your results. Secret Weight Loss.

    Video

    [embedded content]


Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0

    Last Post: Dec. 21/09, 01:01 AM

  2. Replies: 1

    Last Post: Mar. 31/09, 12:05 PM

  3. Replies: 1

    Last Post: May. 12/06, 07:33 AM

  4. Replies: 0

    Last Post: Jan. 07/06, 09:23 PM

  5. Replies: 0

    Last Post: Jan. 06/05, 11:42 PM

Tags for this Thread


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Forum Rules

Members: 199,840
Threads: 47,228
Posts: 396,745
Top Poster: Karky (9,817)
Welcome to our newest member, Edge